Indigenous Soil Characterisation and Farmer Participation in Northern Zambia: Implications for Research and Extension Delivery.

Publication year: 
1993

The theme is that the theoretical thinking in research and extension delivery needs to shift from traditional empiricism to 'agrarian popularism', respecting farmers' traditional knowledge. Specific examples from Zambia are used to explore the reasons why conventional research and extension systems have not been very successful. The main conclusion of the paper is that the mismatch between scientific models and farmers' dynamic realities can largely explain the current failure of research and extension mechanisms.

Interest groups: 
Agriculturalists, researchers and fieldworkers, as well as those working at the community and project level.
Source publication information
Volume: 
Vol. 1
Pages: 
pp. 62-81
In: 
Rural People's Knowledge, Agricultural Research and Extension Practice. The Latin America Papers.
Publisher
IIED Sustainable Agriculture Programme
IIED, 3 Endsleigh Street, London. WC1H 0DD.
London
Publisher reference: 
IIED Sustainable Agriculture Programme

How to find this resource

Shelfmark in IDS Resource Centre
D : Indigenous knowledge 109